Newsletter Signup

City of Burlington Hosting Private Tree Bylaw Public Info Sessions

Photo by Marcos Luiz Photograph on Unsplash.
Photo by Marcos Luiz Photograph on Unsplash.

Anyone looking to learn more about the newly adopted Private Tree Bylaw, unanimously approved by Burlington Council last month, can attend one of several upcoming public information sessions hosted by the City of Burlington.

The sessions are designed to help residents and businesses understand the new bylaw and how it works — covering when a permit is needed, when it’s not, replacement trees, costs and more. Those who attend will also get a chance to ask questions of Forestry staff.

Registration is not necessary for any of the sessions and a Q-and-A will start 15 minutes after the start time.

Please see the list below of when the info sessions will be held and where:

ABOUT THE PRIVATE TREE BYLAW:

As of Jan. 27, 2020, anyone within the City’s urban boundary will need to apply online for a permit and on-site consultation to remove a tree greater than 20 cm in diameter (8”) measured at 1.4 m from the ground, or if you would like to remove more than five trees between 10 and 20 cm (4-8”) measured at 1.4 m from the ground in a calendar year. Heritage trees and endangered species are also protected.

Permits are also needed for any activity that may injure or damage a tree.

To apply for a permit or to read the full bylaw, including information on permits, protected trees, exemptions and fines, visit Burlington.ca/PrivateTree.

— Mayor Marianne Meed Ward

RELATED LINKS:

*Posted by John Bkila, Mayor’s Media and Digital Communications Specialist

 

Receive new post notifications by email

6 thoughts on “City of Burlington Hosting Private Tree Bylaw Public Info Sessions”

  1. My take – 2 classes of user – resident vs developer – are developers held to the exact same costs and rules – I think not simply there are 2 standards – a developer will clear cut an area – while a resident gets fiscally punished – how do you guarantee a level playing field – if one doubts – there are 2 areas were trees were cut down with little recourse or action – guarantee me this – a developer will be held to exact standard including fiscal penalty on every single – tree, bush and shrub – no exception – no question – no in lieu of – also a public facing inventory will be held and accounted for – no exception if not we have a double standard that fiscally punishes resident – what is your take

    1. Hi Tim,
      This is John Bkila, the Mayor’s Media and Digital Communications Specialist. The intent of the private tree bylaw is that everyone who owns property in the City’s urban boundary will be treated equally under the bylaw. The Mayor and Mayor’s Office has found there are some misconceptions out there about how this bylaw will be implemented. We encourage and invite all residents to try and attend one of the sessions listed in the post so they can gain more clarity about all the details surrounding this bylaw and ask questions of Forestry staff. Thank you for commenting on the Mayor’s website.

  2. Often our governments implement programs with some stated benefit but rarely do they ask has the benefit been achieved? To this end would the City be willing to conduct an audit of the Private Tree By Law after one year of operation? The audit should answer the following questions:
    1. Was the cost of running the program covered by the revenue from fees and fines? Costs should include extra staff hired, vehicles and equipment, office space and computer resources.
    2. How many trees were given permission to be cut down?
    3. How many trees were prevented from being cut down?
    4. How many trees were cut down illegally?
    5. How many trees were planted?
    6. What was the net CO2 capture from the program? (environmental groups can provide this information)

    I’m sure that an audit that addresses these questions would alleviate some of the anxiety people may have about the program.

    1. Hi Bob,
      This is John Bkila, the Mayor’s Media and Digital Communications Specialist. Thank you for commenting on the Mayor’s website and bringing up these questions. The information sessions that the City of Burlington will be hosting this month will have a Q-and-A portion with Forestry staff. Mayor Meed Ward and the Mayor’s Office encourage all residents to try and make it out to one of these sessions to ask their questions and get all the details surrounding the implementation of this bylaw. We hope you can make it to one of them.

    1. Hi Steven,
      This is John Bkila, the Mayor’s Media and Digital Communications Specialist. The Mayor and Mayor’s Office has found there are some misconceptions out there about how this bylaw will be implemented. We encourage and invite all residents to try and attend one of the sessions listed in the post so they can gain more clarity about all the details surrounding this bylaw and ask questions of Forestry staff. Thank you for commenting on the Mayor’s website.

What's your take?

Here are guidelines before you comment, and our expectations before we will post:

  • Be civil. Would you speak this way to a good friend? If not, rewrite.
  • Focus on the issues. Build your argument and make your case in support of your opinion from facts, research or other sources. That way we can all learn. “I disagree with so-and-so because…” is fine; “So-and-so is naïve/stupid  for thinking the way he/she does and here’s why…” is not acceptable.
  • Don’t make personal attacks. Don’t assume motives of those you disagree with, make unfounded allegations, spread rumours, or engage in any other behaviours that would discourage you from participating if someone said this to, or about, you. The Golden Rule applies: Do unto others as you would have done to you. We will edit or not post comments with this type of content.
  • Say it once: When comments from the same individual or individuals become repetitive, going over ground already stated, we reserve the right to close commenting.
  • Use your full, and real, name. If wish to make a comment in public, we expect you will publicly stand behind it with your name. If you don’t want to publicly reveal your name, that’s fine; you are always welcome to share your thoughts with me privately via my email below. I welcome and consider all feedback in making decisions for the community.
  • Have fun, consider and learn. Share your views and read those of others. May we all benefit from a healthy exchange of ideas, and learn a little more about the people in our community, what you think, and what’s important to each of you. You may end up changing your mind about an issue; even if you don’t, we hope everyone will gain a greater understanding of why people have different perspectives.

Newsletter Sign Up

Phone: 905-335-7607
Email:  mayor@burlington.ca

Constituent Assistant: Hannelie van Niekerk
905-335-7600, ext. 7689