Marianne Meed Ward

I was inspired to seek public office because I believe, like so many of you, “I can do something about that” on the issues we face. As councilor, my role is to take a stand on what’s best for residents and go to bat for it. Pushback is inevitable from those who don’t have the community’s interests at heart. I will stand with you and for you, to achieve the best interests of our city, without caving to unacceptable compromise in the name of consensus.

In my continued efforts to build a dialogue on city issues with our local building community, I am meeting monthly with the Halton chapter of the Building Industry and Land Development (BiLD) Association. The West End Home Builders’ Association (WE-HBA) and Ward 6 Councillor Angelo Bentivegna, as Council’s representative on Halton’s Housing Development Liaison Committee, …

Building a Continuing Dialogue with Burlington’s Building Community Read More »

Have you ever looked around Burlington and thought to yourself you have a good idea that could help us do better as a city and community? The City of Burlington has created a Get Involved Burlington — our online engagement webpage that allows residents to connect with City Hall anytime, anywhere on matters where community …

How to Get Involved in the City of Burlington Read More »

Yesterday the Federal Government tabled its first budget document in two years. Titled “A Recovery Plan for Jobs, Growth, and Resilience,” at 739 pages this budget is a lot of information to digest with many meaningful implications for Canadians. Presented by Deputy Prime Minister and Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland, the budget outlined $101.4 billion in …

Federal Budget 2021 Highlights & Impacts on Burlington Read More »

*Administrator’s Note: Since the original posting of this announcement, the Province of Ontario has allowed playgrounds to be open again — all other outdoor amenities continue to be closed. — Following today’s provincial government announcement of additional restrictions, I am calling an emergency Burlington City Council meeting for tomorrow at 10 a.m. As much as …

Province Announces More COVID-19 Restrictions: Update on City services & Program Shutdowns to Flatten the 3rd Wave Curve Read More »

I submitted the following opinion to the Hamilton Spectator in response to the March 3, 2021 column by Joan Little, titled Burlington council grapples with tax hike. Click here to read my submission to the Spec or scroll down. — We appreciate the interest shown in Burlington’s budget by columnist Joan Little, and welcome this …

Setting the Record Straight on Burlington’s Reserve Funds Read More »

Today is the second annual In Memoriam Day in the City of Burlington, a day we honour and collectively mourn all those individuals from our community who have passed away in the last year. As a population of almost 200,000 people, Burlington loses nearly 1,200 of our residents every year. Each one plays a valuable …

Burlington Marks Second Annual In Memoriam Day Read More »

On Feb. 22, we held the first meeting of the Aldershot Quarry Community Liaison Committee (AQCLC). Below are some notes and highlights from that meeting. I want to thank all the members of the committee for attending last month and for their continued commitment to open dialogue, transparency and collaboration. The AQCLC is group comprised …

Aldershot Quarry Community Liaison Committee Meeting No. 1 Highlights Read More »

At today’s Ontario’s Big City Mayors (OBCM) virtual meeting we endorsed a resolution asking the Federal and Provincial governments to emphasize supportive housing and small business in restarting the economy. We passed 5 motions related to: Rapid Housing Initiative Funding Supportive Housing Funding Safe Restart Agreement Phase 2 BERN Resolution on support for the restaurant …

Ontario’s Big City Mayors Urge Federal, Provincial Governments to Emphasize Supportive Housing & Small Business in Restarting the Economy Read More »

From Jan. 25-26, 2021, I attended the virtual Rural Ontario Municipalities Association (ROMA) conference. The annual conference remains an opportunity to connect with colleagues and the province and learn from experts on important and timely rural issues. More than 1,100 participants took part, virtually, in the first large gathering of municipal officials in Ontario since …

Infrastructure Minister Speaks to Improving Rural Broadband, Cellular Services in Letter to Burlington Mayor Read More »

Burlington Foundation’s Community Fund Granting Program addresses key focus areas highlighted through the Vital Signs® report, as well as several field of interest focus areas (including Mental Health & Wellness, Youth & Young Adults, Housing, Environment, Seniors, Poverty, Transportation, Work & Careers, Newcomers & Inclusivity and Performing Arts). The granting envelope for the 2017-18 granting …

Burlington Foundation Community Fund Granting Program receiving applications Jan. 9, 29 Read More »

Without an aggressive strategy of job creation, Burlington residents will see their property taxes spike, services cut or development expand into rural areas.

Here’s why: Providing all of the services required for residents – community services and infrastructure for example – far exceeds the tax revenues collected. By contrast, the “industrial, commercial, institutional” tax class – or “ICI” -pays more than double the residential property tax rate, but only costs a fraction of that to service. There can be as much as an 80% profit on industrial taxes, versus a 40% loss on residential taxes.

A balance between residential and ICI tax revenue is critical to municipal health, yet currently, residential taxes account for 82% of Burlington’s tax revenue, versus 18% from the commercial/industrial sector.
Non residential growth has essentially flatlined in Burlington over the past 15 years, while residential growth has almost tripled. Burlington used to see double digit employment growth; now, 2% annual growth is “optimistic.” When residential growth outpaces economic growth, the city is left with three unpalatable choices: cut services, dramatically increase property taxes, or expand development into the rural area.

Though the budget includes several need-to-have items – our contribution to the hospital redevelopment, money for infrastructure, the new Alton community centre and library, and enhanced transit service – it also includes almost $2 million in “nice-to-haves”.